POISON IVY CURES


Man’s search for effective poison ivy cures spans a long and interesting history. The poison ivy plant, itself, is interesting, although undeniably 

unpleasant. This plant has inspired a desire for a treatment, maybe even a poison ivy pill. It is a member of the Rhus family, and Captain John Smith, reportedly, gave poison ivy its name in 1609.

The sap of poison ivy, called urushiol (pronounced oo-roo-shee-ohl), surely must have inspired a fervent desire for effective poison ivy cures even before Captain Smith’s time. One nanogram (billionth of a gram) is said to be all that is needed to cause a rash making it easy to imagine the desire of people to find viable relief from the painful itching, weeping, swelling, and blistering that affects most of us when we come into contact with this pesky plant. Imagine how our forefathers would have appreciated a poison ivy pill to relieve the symptoms of poison ivy exposure.


The nature of poison ivy

Poison Ivy is thin skinned. Its leaves and stems are delicate and easily bruised by the passing of animals, wind, or the unsuspecting placement of a garden tool. When the outer layer of the leaf or stem becomes damaged it exudes urushiol and makes us wish for poison ivy cures.

Urushiol adheres to skin, clothing, pets, or a gardener’s hoe. This sap is not only contained in the leaves and stems of the plant; the roots and vines also contain urushiol. This sap of the poison ivy is so potent a substance that it has no doubt made man yearn for effective poison ivy cures throughout the ages. A poison ivy pill that could protect us from these much-dreaded plants would be welcome indeed.

Urushiol, the sap of poison ivy

Urushiol is so potent; in fact, that not only does it cause relatively immediate rashes to appear, it may remain viable for decades in a dry environment. Even in warm, moist, surroundings Urushiol remains potent for a year, possibly longer. It is easy to see why we have searched for poison ivy treatment, and may some day even have a poison ivy pill.

Treatments of the past

Several interesting treatments have come to us from early medical literature. King’s American Dispensatory, 1898, mentions using a solution of “Caustic Potash, sufficiently strong to render the skin soapy.” Another treatment touted by King’s is “Sugar of Lead (lead acetate),” and further reports “while this treatment has long been a favorite agent, it has very often failed to give relief.”

These descriptions reveal the lengths to which people have gone in search of effective poison ivy treatments that will relieve the agony of coming into contact with this plant. Maybe soon we will have a poison ivy pill that will bring relief. Until then, the best defense is early treatment.

A Treatment for Today

After several years of researching poison ivy cures, and seeking a topical solution or poison ivy pill to help limit the severity and duration of this rash, the editors of Healthy Skin Guide feel confident that we can recommend a treatment called Burt's Bees Poison Ivy Soap.

Burt's Bees Poison Ivy Soap is all-natural, and works quickly to eliminate the painful symptoms of poison ivy exposure. Burt's Bees Poison Ivy Soap does not contain any dangerous steroids. Follow the link provided to learn more about this product, and see how it can help you.


More than Poison Ivy Cures on our Poison Ivy Symptoms page

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